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Brutalist Architecture

Each week we bring you a trio of Good Things in art and design, chosen from the infinite creative archives of Present & Correct

Brutalist Architecture of the World
Brutalist Architecture of the World

Good Things celebrates the best of the world's brutalist architecture

Solid, linear, concrete blocks are the prime characteristics of brutalist architecture, a style which thrived between the 1950s and 1970s. The term 'brutalism' comes from the French 'béton brut' which translates as 'raw concrete'. It's an acquired taste but one which is becoming more and more revered, in an age of vast expanses of glass. This week's Good Things takes you to three destinations, all abundant in beautiful concrete blocks.

Brutalist Architecture of Russia
Brutalist Architecture of Russia
Russia has long been associated with brutalism with its fortress-like monuments and government buildings exuding power through their concrete dominance. Most were built much later than European examples, around the mid 70s to late 80s. You can see many right here.

Brutalist Architecture of Israel
Brutalist Architecture of Israel
Tel Aviv is famed for its white, Bauhaus architecture, the work of exiled Jewish German architects who moved there in the 1920s and 30s. Later it became dominated by brutalism or 'grey architecture', much of it designed or overseen by Ram Karmi. The Beautalist is doing a grand job of recording the buildings of Tel Aviv and the rest of Israel. Visit here.

Brutalist Architecture of Scotland
Brutalist Architecture of Scotland
Many fine brutalist buildings in Scotland are undergoing modernisation or complete destruction. Scotbrut aims to record the best examples before it is too late, and there are some real beauties to be seen here.

Present & Correct is a design blog and stationery store in London founded by graphic designers Neal Whittington and Mark Smith.

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