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Lego Ice Creams

We unveil our favourite post on AnOther Loves, and interview its Lover

Lego ice creams
Lego ice creams

In the midst of the current heat wave, perhaps it is the search for an "unmeltable", Willy Wonka style ice cream that accounts for the popularity of this week's Most Loved post, a brilliant set of Lego Ice Creams, chosen by Neal of Present & Correct.

During the recent heat wave ice creams and ice lollies have become a daily staple – eaten as fast as possible in an attempt to avoid the melted mess that so often accompanies them. Perhaps it is the search for an "unmeltable", Willy Wonka style ice cream that accounts for the popularity of this week's Most Loved post, a brilliant set of Lego Ice Creams, as chosen by Neal of London stationers Present & Correct.

The Lego Group was started by Danish carpenter Ole Kirk Christiansen, who began making wooden toys in his Billund workshop in 1932. In 1934, he named his company Lego, from the Danish phrase leg godt, which means "play well". Lego introduced plastic toys to their range in 1947 and two years later they produced an early version of the now world-renowned interlocking bricks, then called "Automatic Binding Bricks". The modern Lego brick was patented on 28 January 1958, following a variety of design tweaks, and bricks from that year are still compatible with current bricks. Soon the burgeoning Lego craze began and the company started capitalising on the vast potential of their simple bricks for the creation of everything from vehicles to miniature towns and cities (populated by Lego men and women), and even working robots.

"The name Lego comes from the Danish phrase leg godt, which means 'play well'"

Aside from the many Lego themed books and cartoons, as well as the forthcoming film (allegedly set for release next February), Lego has also been popular as an art medium, exploited for its versatility and kitsch potential by the likes of Alex Eylar, who recreated iconic scenes from films using the bricks and figurines, and indeed Henning Birkeland – the multimedia, VFX and 3D artist behind these winning ice creams. Here, we catch up with Neal to find out his own proudest Lego-building achievement as well as what flavour ice cream he thinks he would be...

Why did you choose to Love these Lego Ice Creams?
They're so perfectly diminutive and cleverly made.

Ice creams or ice lollies?
Ice cream on a cone with a flake. Or a Vienetta.

What ice cream flavour would you be and why?
Definitely a cardboard wrapped block of neopolitan.

Did you play with Lego when you were younger and do you remember your proudest Lego-building achievement?
Yes I did! So much. We had a massive old nappy box containing a million Lego pieces. At least. Proudest moment would have to be finishing my Lego Technics go kart – not life size!

What was your most treasured childhood possession?
I had a really nice miniature Post Office from Grandma which I loved. It had a phone, stamps, tax discs. Very good.

What's your favourite summer dish?
Spaghetti vongole with a nice salad.

What are you excited about this summer?
Gin.

What was the last thing you bought?
A packet of Oreos to have with a cuppa. 5 minutes ago!

Text by Daisy Woodward

Daisy Woodward is the AnOthermag.com social media and editorial assistant.

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