Columns on fashion, culture and ideas

Art & Culture / AnOther's Lovers

Jungle Juice

We unveil our favourite post on AnOther Loves, and interview its Lover

Jungle Juice
Jungle Juice

With the Notting Hill festivities just days away, it is fitting that a carnival spirit has taken over the AnOther Loves stream – as represented by this phosphorescent take on Jungle Juice winning the vote...

With the Notting Hill festivities just days away, it is fitting that a carnival spirit has taken over the AnOther Loves stream – as represented by this phosphorescent take on Jungle Juice winning the vote. Created by blending gin, ice, tonic water and lemonade concentrate, the drink is an unassuming opaque pink in daylight, but transforms into an extraordinary otherworldly impression of the aurora-borealis with the aid of a black-light.

While certainly Jungle Juice in its physical hallucinatory form, strictly speaking this recipe does not live up to the spirit of the drink. Originally, the phrase referred to an improvised concoction, first created by US Marines in the Pacific during World War II, whose only nod to having a recipe was that neither beer nor whiskey was welcome. A vast tub would be set up and revelers would add their contribution as they arrived, be it hard liquor or tropical juices, to create a mélange with no discernable flavour but with fearsome potency. As the night progressed, the jungle element of the name would come into play as inebriation levels increased, inhibitions departed, and drinkers began to display what could coyly be termed as “animal-like behavior”. More recently, drinks containing ayahuasca, a plant infusion drunk along the banks of the Amazon, have been dubbed Jungle Juice. These brews are used in shamanic rituals, causing extreme hallucinations that are believed to aid higher knowledge and open portals to higher dimensions.

So, in celebration of Carnival, and before heading out to buy black-lights and rum, we speak to the discoverer of this amazing concoction, Sarah Volpi, to ask her about her ideal party scenario and the surreal impact of the aurora-borealis.

Where did you find the Jungle Juice?
I first found this pic by browsing the Coolhunting Mag website and, as I was really struck by its appearance, I looked for some information on The Campus Companion which is responsible for this amazing creation.

Why did you choose to love it?
I decide to Love it because of the spatial effect conveyed by its aurora-borealis colors, it's really surreal.

Where would you choose to make and serve it? 
I think I would serve this drink during a crazy, wild party, somewhere with no lights, maybe even in the mountains, surrounded by darkness and a sky full of stars.

"I would serve this drink during a crazy, wild party, somewhere with no lights, maybe even in the mountains, surrounded by darkness and a sky full of stars."

Have you ever been to the jungle?
No. I've never been to the jungle yet, but if I have one of these I think I might get there.

The name Jungle Juice is believed to have originated from the potency of the ingredients that caused the drinker to exhibit wild, animal-esque behaviour - have you had any such experiences?
I think that sometimes is right to a have a drink and let oneself go, it just makes you feel free to be youself and have fun, but i never exaggerated. You could really mess things up.

This looks like a fairytale elixir - what is the most magical thing that's happened to you?
When it happens to me to intensely desire something, of any kind, and then it gets concrete, somehow, well that is magical to me.

What is your drink of choice?
One of my favourite cocktail is Sex on the Beach but I also like drinking Rossini and Spritz.

If you made a cocktail, what would be in it, and what would you call it? 
I would love to create something particular by mixing an alcoholic part with passion fruit and orange juice, moreover I would add some dark chocolate on top. If that was possible, I wouldn't drink anything else. Since it sounds as delicious as a dessert I would probably call it Sin City or something like that.

Text by Tish Wrigley

Tish Wrigley is the AnOther assistant editor.

Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter for weekly updates