Columns on fashion, culture and ideas

Women's Fashion / Object of Desire

Céline S/S14 Bracelets

In this column, creatives cleverly reinterpret AnOther's most desired objects of the season

Crushed metal bracelet by Céline
Crushed metal bracelet by Céline Photography by Charles Negre

Photographer Charles Negre presents Bauhaus-inspired stills in AnOther's latest Object of Desire, Céline's S/S14 bracelets

Last year, Céline revolutionised the humble plaid shopper, and for S/S14 they have once again transformed trash into treasure with their chic play on the crushed can. Their enameled brass cuffs are reminiscent of crumpled aluminnium, placed alongside thick block bracelets, in bright primary colours.

Photographer Charles Negre has taken a series of photographs for AnOther, turning the architectural bracelets into large-scale geometric structures. “I thought of the beautiful photogram works of Moholy-Nagy,” he explains. “This is where the idea of using multiple exposures came from. The traditional, often kitsch technique, when applied with a digital process, becomes very interesting.” Negre continued to be inspired by contemporary artists including Barbara Kasten, Jessica Eaton, Shirana Shahbazi, Theo van Doesburg and the Memphis Group, each recognised for their graphic, colourful approach to art and objects. "The bracelets reminded me of modernist furniture. Since my first references are from the Bauhaus period, I tried to find a photo process that could match with that while having a contemporary twist."

"At first the bracelets reminded me of modernist furniture" — Charles Negre

Block bracelet by Céline
Block bracelet by Céline Photography by Charles Negre
The S/S14 Céline backstory references graffiti, inspired by Hungarian photographer Brassaï. The pop colour collection features distorted and oversized squiggles and brush strokes, played out across tank tops, woven jacquards and wavy skirts. The sculptural bracelets mimic the T-shirt prints, alongside printed canvas shoes and geometric heels. Céline repeatedly captures a sense of abstract minimalism, or as Juergen Teller once put it, “really elegant but weird; almost nerdy but perverse.”

Text by Mhairi Graham

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